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Cite as: Wilson, D. (2019). Structured Image Framework Theory (SIFT): A Neurologically Based Therapeutic Technique Designed to Understand and Process the Traumatic Experience. International Journal of Neuropsychotherapy, 7(2), 43–55. doi:10.12744/ijnpt.2019.043-055


Structured Image Framework Theory (SIFT):
A Neurologically Based Therapeutic Technique Designed to Understand and Process the Traumatic Experience

 

Daren Wilson
Clear View Psychology Services Pty Limited

 

Abstract

This follow-up paper to “Structured Image Framework Theory (SIFT): A Neurologically Based Diagrammatic Structure Enabling the Therapist to Describe Emotionally Distressing Situations Within Known Brain Functions” (Wilson, 2018) will continue to discuss the dynamics of the newly developed structured image framework theory (SIFT) and detail specifically how areas of the brain relate to trauma processes. The SIFT therapeutic model allows clients to develop processes that are linked to current knowledge of how the brain operates during and after experiencing trauma.

The SIFT model is designed for use by the therapist as a flexible structure that is comprehensible to a client who has experienced a significant life-threatening crisis. The descriptive framework is concise, simple, and
dynamic, which allows the client to work within his or her own individual belief system during therapy. SIFT enables the therapist to link with the client using a visual structure based on how the brain functions when a person experiences a traumatic incident. SIFT is an applied visual diagram that draws from neurological research and multiple client descriptions given by trauma sufferers over a period of more than 25 years of clinical experience.

SIFT is designed as an inclusive neuropsychotherapeutic approach capable of forming the foundation for a range of therapeutic techniques that may be used to further process trauma to an adaptable stabilized level. It aims to provide hope by empowering the client to understand the multiple dynamics associated with a traumatic event, and forms a practical basis for both client and clinician to understand the presenting symptomology and predict future reactions to triggering stimuli.

SIFT’s diagrammatic visual structure ultimately promotes an enhanced focus on client control and encourages a stronger therapeutic alliance during therapy, as it predictably describes the actions of how the brain operates when a client is exposed to a critical life crisis.


Author Note
Daren Wilson, Director/Principal Psychologist, Clear View Psychology Services Pty Limited, 1 Abbotsford Road, Katoomba, NSW, Australia.
Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Daren Wilson, Clear View Psychology Services Pty Limited. Ph. +61 1300 654 066 Fax. +61 1300 654 077 Email clear@pnc.com.au


Acknowledgements
The author would like to thank guest peer reviewer Joy Kinder.


Published online: July 2019